Arle Valley Voice for the people of the Arle Valley Benefice is published monthly (except for January). It is on sale at the west end of St John’s Church and at Six West newsagents (both right in the centre of Alresford) from just before the start of the month.
Here we give you a taste of what is in the current issue – we hope you will come and buy a copy. It’s a real bargain at £1.20 with many interesting articles including: our excellent gardening page by Rose Briar; a recipe in Parish Pantry;  information about many local events – and the always amusingly quirky Scenes from Alresford Life. We also publish news of Baptisms, Weddings and Successes to celebrate in People Matter, together with obituaries. There are details of many local events, and you will also find many useful trade advertisements.
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Leader from April Edition

 

By the time you read this Lent will be nearly
over. So – how did you get on? Did you try to give
something up? Did you vow to take on something
new? Is it time to congratulate yourself on
success? I must come clean and say that this
year I made a conscious decision to give up
giving up things. I truly have a mixed record on
the Lent abstinence front. Some years I’ve had no
struggle at all with the wine, or the chocolate, or
whatever delight I decided to deny myself, and
other years have been one long, agonising battle
ending with surrender, sometimes not even half
way through. For me though, there’s always a
common theme at the start of each foray into
Lent self-denial – optimism.
Spring is well on its way now and as ever, the
whole of nature seems optimistic. Even writing
about it as the rain and wind take charge today,
I feel a real warmth of anticipation for those
blossom covered trees, burgeoning flowers and
frolicking lambs that I know will be out there
soon.
Another word for optimism is hope. This is
something I’m starting to become really good at,
and the more I practice it, the easier it becomes,
and the way I practice it is by praying. When I
pray I’m putting all my hopes (and fears) in God’s
hands. Now I know that God knows me better
that I know myself, and I’m sure some of the
things I hope for are not what he thinks are best
for me. In that case, my only way forward is to
trust Him.

The whole world’s been going through a tough
time of course, and here in the Arle Valley
Benefice we’ve been keeping our heads up as
high as we can, but it’s not always easy to shrug
off the fears of what the future might bring,
including wondering how long we might have to
wait before a new priest can be appointed.
Now this is where my optimism and hope come
to the fore again. The Bishop has recently told
us that he is extremely keen to make an early
appointment with a view to someone being
in post by early October, and the wardens and
PCCs are urgently playing their parts in moving
the process forward. I trust that God has a plan for us, and I would love to believe that you
too share my confidence in Him.
Easter is here. God shows His love for us through
Jesus’ death and resurrection, turning downcast
hearts towards a future of hope. This is the
perfect time to mirror that spirit of hope in our
prayers. We are well on our way with our planned
Prayer Time each Sunday, bringing our prayers to
Him in unison at 11am. So we continue to pray,
and trust God that in our search for a priest the
right person will hear Him speaking to them.
In this verse from Romans, Paul puts clearly what
I have struggled to say.
‘Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy
and peace in believing, so that you will abound
in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit’ (Romans
15:13)
Happy Easter!

Jane Parsons

 

People Matter

John Ian Hamilton (‘Ian’) Mackintosh

John Ian Hamilton (‘Ian’) Mackintosh of Alresford
died at home on January 22nd. He was born in
Scotland on March 3, 1940 as the second child
and only son of Jack and Elizabeth (née West)
Mackintosh. Ian’s father died in Istanbul during
the final months of the war while serving as an
intelligence officer. His mother, ‘Betty’, raised Ian
and his sister Sarah in Tunbridge Wells. Betty,
who would live to be 103, introduced Ian to two
of his enduring loves, fishing and golf.
Ian secured a scholarship to Tonbridge School
where he was Head Boy, captain of the tennis
team and first XV in rugby. He attended Clare
College, Cambridge as a Scholar. In his first year,
the local golf courses proved more alluring than
the classroom and as a consequence his college
demoted him from Scholar to Exhibitioner at the
end of his first year. He graduated in 1961 with a
degree in English and seldom, if ever, disabused
an interviewer impressed by the dual distinctions
of Scholar and Exhibitioner on his CV.
After university Ian embarked on a career in
the City as a merchant banker. In his late 20s
during a winter holiday in Verbier he met a
young American woman named Victoria (‘Vicky’)
Cobb. He proposed in Rome a few months later
and they married the following year. The couple
started their life together in Paris, but had moved
to London by the time their first child, Alexandra,
was born in 1972. After stints abroad in Lebanon
and Greece, the family resettled in London with
their second daughter Juliet in tow.
In 1977 the Mackintoshes acquired a house in
Alresford where Ian had a rod on the River Arle.
Their third daughter, Evelyn, arrived in 1979.
Three years later Ian’s career took him to New
York where the family welcomed the birth of their son, Henry. Upon returning to Britain in
1990, the Mackintoshes settled permanently in
Alresford where Ian’s mother joined them for her
final years.
Ian spent retirement indulging in his two
favourite pastimes. He was a lifelong member at
Rye, and latterly Royal Porthcawl; and he played
for the Old Tonbridgian Golf Society. He and his
bull terrier were a familiar sight at the Alresford
Golf Club. When not playing golf, he often could
be seen playing a trout from the footbridge at
Ovington where he fished as a member of Sir
Peter Ramsbotham’s fishing syndicate. As well
as being a devoted sportsman, he was a devout
Christian. He and Vicky were regular worshippers
at St. Peter’s Ovington.
Despite being wheelchair bound, Ian unhooked
his final wild brown trout from the Upper Itchen
at Borough Farm in September of 2020. He is
survived by his wife of 51 years, his son and three
daughters, his four granddaughters, Kate, Honor, Sarah and Emma Aspbury, and his two sons-
in-law, David Cleaver and Peter Aspbury. He is buried near his mother in the churchyard behind
St. Peter’s.

Contributed by Peter Aspbury.

 

 


John Ian Hamilton (‘Ian’) Mackintosh of Alresford
died at home on January 22nd. He was born in
Scotland on March 3, 1940 as the second child
and only son of Jack and Elizabeth (née West)
Mackintosh. Ian’s father died in Istanbul during
the final months of the war while serving as an
intelligence officer. His mother, ‘Betty’, raised Ian
and his sister Sarah in Tunbridge Wells. Betty,
who would live to be 103, introduced Ian to two
of his enduring loves, fishing and golf.
Ian secured a scholarship to Tonbridge School
where he was Head Boy, captain of the tennis
team and first XV in rugby. He attended Clare
College, Cambridge as a Scholar. In his first year,
the local golf courses proved more alluring than
the classroom and as a consequence his college
demoted him from Scholar to Exhibitioner at the
end of his first year. He graduated in 1961 with a
degree in English and seldom, if ever, disabused
an interviewer impressed by the dual distinctions
of Scholar and Exhibitioner on his CV.
After university Ian embarked on a career in
the City as a merchant banker. In his late 20s
during a winter holiday in Verbier he met a
young American woman named Victoria (‘Vicky’)
Cobb. He proposed in Rome a few months later
and they married the following year. The couple
started their life together in Paris, but had moved
to London by the time their first child, Alexandra,
was born in 1972. After stints abroad in Lebanon
and Greece, the family resettled in London with
their second daughter Juliet in tow.
In 1977 the Mackintoshes acquired a house in
Alresford where Ian had a rod on the River Arle.
Their third daughter, Evelyn, arrived in 1979.
Three years later Ian’s career took him to New
York where the family welcomed the birth of

their son, Henry. Upon returning to Britain in
1990, the Mackintoshes settled permanently in
Alresford where Ian’s mother joined them for her
final years.
Ian spent retirement indulging in his two
favourite pastimes. He was a lifelong member at
Rye, and latterly Royal Porthcawl; and he played
for the Old Tonbridgian Golf Society. He and his
bull terrier were a familiar sight at the Alresford
Golf Club. When not playing golf, he often could
be seen playing a trout from the footbridge at
Ovington where he fished as a member of Sir
Peter Ramsbotham’s fishing syndicate. As well
as being a devoted sportsman, he was a devout
Christian. He and Vicky were regular worshippers
at St. Peter’s Ovington.
Despite being wheelchair bound, Ian unhooked
his final wild brown trout from the Upper Itchen
at Borough Farm in September of 2020. He is
survived by his wife of 51 years, his son and three
daughters, his four granddaughters, Kate, Honor,

Sarah and Emma Aspbury, and his two sons-
in-law, David Cleaver and Peter Aspbury. He is

buried near his mother in the churchyard behind
St. Peter’s.
Contributed by Peter Aspbury.

People Matter

The Arle Valley Voice April 2021 11

People Matter